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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 655 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the environment and such as the council and safe guards for the city's families such as the departments reduced risk pesticide list and whereas on thursday, july 25, the program celebrated the first class of apprenticeship graduates and city departments announced the plans to extend the program going forward, and an opportunity to serve even more members of the community and forcing the potential for the environment and the environment now graduate and now, therefore be it resolved that the san francisco on the environment and come mend the labor union and the first class on this historic occasion and which the program continued success going forward. >> okay. thank you very much. [ applause ] . >> courtney, john and others from 261. >> all right. >> thank you. >> i want to thank the commission for taking the time out of your busy schedule to acknowledge this program. and i want to be very brief and respectful of your time. and by just giving you a little bit of information about the program and about why we think that it is relevant to your mission. first it is really important for me to intro
everyone, welcome to the san francisco commission on the environment. >> today is tuesday 24th and it is 5:08 p.m. and we ask you that you turn off your cell phones and the first item on the agenda is roll call. >> colleagues you will remember that we met our two newest colleagues, josefowitz and wan. and i remember when i was new to the commission and wanting to get to know everybody quickly and wanting the folks to get to know me and not having that chance last time, this was just a brief item just to meet our newest commissioners and when we have our retreat we will learn more about each other. but if we could just learn quickly a little bit about josefowitz, and welcome to the commission. and then commissioner wan. >> thank you, so much. >> president, arce. >> and i am thrilled to be here and the background and i have developed and built the solar power plants and some of the expertise that i hope to bring to the commission and to the department and to the city. i think that we have tremendous assets, as a city, that we earn ourself and within the city that can be exploited to greener,
scrolls. others were linked to him, and spoke to each other in a social environment. other examples occur throughout history. .artin luther use the pamphlets poetry in the court of and berlin. tom payne and his pamphlet of common sense. there are many examples. i'm arguing that when we use social media today, it is a reversion to what media operated like centuries before us. >> the distinct between letterwriting and the conversation was further blurred by the custom of dictating outgoing letters described and having incoming letters read aloud. you were someone like cicero or caesar, you would have ascribed. caesar was famous for being able to dictate to letters at once. you would be dictating letters to them. you would have a staff of messengers who would carry these messages to your friends. incoming messages brought a scroll. romans like cicero and caesar were capable of reading and writing. they got more done if they use describes. the role played by scribes and messengers, most of her slaves, is akin to the role that broadband plays for us today. the reason why we can do social media
is -- only change your behavior if the environment allows for it. 600,000 food items have 80% adulteration by added sugar, it is awfully hard to change her behavior in a toxic environment. the toxic environment has to improve in order for you to be able to manifest those changes in behavior. that is what i would say. >> and to sustain them over time. that is all, thank you. >> that is all the time we have. i would like to remind you -- rob will stick around a little bit to sign his book. finally, i would like to thank him. >> thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> you are talking about litigation -- span, two up on c- supreme court justices. we begin with clarence thomas. he talks about his life before and after his appointment. kagan on the workings of the nation's highest court and that dedication ceremony for the winston churchill bust in the nations capital. and the head of google research shows how computers are being designed to learn. on the next "washington journal," a reporter discus
about making urban environments vital. given the present political move, people are open to new ideas. that is true across the country. our burners are being asked to come into centers of various cities for aetna. -- right now. whehowever, as soon as things gt better, they are escorted out. but we might begin to break that cycle. it is just wonderful to walk out on the street and see the world walking by. >> are you giving the twitter deal? >> yes, we are. we just founded a new nonprofit. black rock arts foundation, which is dedicated to spreading interactive, a collaborative art throughout the world. now we have founded but we call the burning and project. -- what we call the burning man project. it eventually leads to the event itself. this is a wonderful opportunity. the thing about burning man, when you look at the variety of people that go there, when you look at this environment, where all the normal boundaries are down in every department of human knowledge and endeavor. if you ask what possible application that we have created that may be useful loud in the desert, -- what wou
an environment with labor and job development. that's the green color community that are being promised to folks. we how need to start laborer into the future but it has to build coalitions can only be the folks who care about 1r50i6789 but has to be the people caring families. when he think about the together and we include folks when we include those folks that are under employed when we include those folks to see the best possibility we come up with the best legislation for all. those folks have had that and i think those people see the good assignment is good for everything. amen, amen. when we do that it's good (laughter) >> once again, i want to thank the department and director luminal and supervisor farrell for the wonderful piece of legislation that's bone put forth. thank you. (clapping.) >> thanks ann going low. at this point i want to bring up jeanine from luminal contractor >> (clapping) >> thank you very much. what a great can i this is a great resolution. this is a triple win for san francisco energy solar and conservatism reduce the costs of operating our homes they reduce
and it excellent in association with the environment sorry with relationship to the environment and finally, at 47-year-old it's age eligible. the subject believe when it was 19 years old it was classified as a non-rated building. the characteristic buildings are identified telephone number on pages 5 and 6 and concluding the connecting bridge and art ways and the design by mark adams. it is - the department recommends that a solution for a change of designation to a change of category that building. it's included in your packet and if adapted today, this item will be considered for future distribution. that concludes my presentation and i'll turn it over for a short premise and i'll present letters for the commission for the property owner. >> good afternoon. i'm christen architecture historian at page and turn ball i have a brief presentation okay. my presentation provides a few illnesses and the summary of finding for article 11 change of designation. you'll see here an aerial view where the wrecky is located on california street adjacent to old st. marys church there's a bridge and another b
. you began to get reports from scientists that it is a serious rack to the environment -- wreck to the environment and ways of life around the globe. look at what begins to happen. that issue comes to the forefront and there are big changes that occur in the republican party with the rise of the newt gingrich movement throwing out republicans were willing to copper mice with the democrats. part companies. that is an important moment. senior, w bush, bush amendments were passed on the clean air act they use a kind of system to control after the raid in the northeast. acid rain in in -- the northeast. from then on, come worst parts of ways. you see an extraordinary polarization. zerolicans tending toward and democrats gradually up. and i'm really heard as you look -- an unruly heard as you look. public opinion splits from then on. near as the elected leaders. opinion isblic closer to the democrats up through the end of this. for one take away was that anybody who thought an issue having to do with global warming was not a partisan issue in the 2007 was not looking at the data with
grows, if you follow the metaphor that bullying is a systemic virus, then the environment has to change so the virus cannot grow and the only way the environment changes is if youth and adults begin to speak with one voice about changing the social norms that allows it to happen. it makes sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to
standpoint is that you can build an environment, a peer group-an alternative peer group, so to speak-that can have a positive impact and supportive impact on a young adult in need of recovery, whether it be mental illness, whether it be substance abuse, whatever the issues are. and i think we see a growing trend in regards to this millennial generation in seeking a supportive kind of relationship with each other. i think, you know, the bullying campaigns have done immense work in regards to helping move forward into a supportive kind of relationship with each other, from childhood into young adulthood. that's a very good point. i want to ask you, jim, a followup question related to-you mentioned a number of recovery high schools and campuses that there are around the country. i don't believe that's nearly enough, considering the numbers that we spoke about. how does one go about, if one wanted to get engaged and bring this type of support to their community? well, that's part of our organization's goals is to help support grass-roots campaigns to help start recovery school movements within co
's play foosball. but if you let people loose in an environment -- people will always give to a greater gift. it is just a principle. if a group get together to give a gift to an entire city, it is easy to find people who will give to that. and the consequence is, you can learn a lot. talk about a networking opportunity. but nobody ever went there to network. they went out there to give their energy, imagination, their heart to something. >> there is that collaboration, the cross-disciplinary thing that happens out there, but i also feel like there is a bit of a sense of competition. people are trying to outdo each other, try to outdo each other trt impressive thing. >> that is human nature. i read a few years ago somebody complaining, i remember the good old days. you could put up a pink flamingo in front of your tent and it was cool. now with all of these big projects, i feel few tile -- futile. well, they learned the wrong lesson. the interesting thing is, people say that they are connected, but in an environment like that, it is easy to get connected. it is easy to get help. unless
and business friendly environment several multi nationals set up camp in malaysia. it's not just the giants numerous small and medium enterprises have the factories in the country. among them is the french group's to iraq which has bases in europe the united states and brazil for twenty years from its factory on the outskirts of kuala lumpur stuck has been producing machines for packaging and fitting for exports to the asia pacific region. it will topple. there is a petticoat policy cost ratio between the structures offered by the government to buy them in eighteen states that the economic environment the educational environment that one of the costs associated with this group with a fiesta. the report so we will continue to defend this man a team structure of production but also for development or in line with regional meets small. what the shoe was going through the moss is a highly competitive international sector said iraq is channeling more and more resorts is into research and development. our correspondent in asia says she told me there are about eight thousand companies from forty d
. everyone agrees that we need to protect the environment but we should do so in a way that is open and honest. democracy requires transparency and accountability. yet the epa's justifications for its regulations are cloaked in secret science. it appears the epa bends the law instructs as the signs to justify its own objectives. americans impacted by the agency's regulations have the right to see the data and determine for themselves independently that these regulations are based on sound science or a partisan agenda. the epa's agenda to expand its reach across the u.s. represents a troubling trend. for example take epa's current attempt to redefine its jurisdiction under the clean water act. it seeks to expand the definition of waters of the u.s. to give the agency unprecedented new authority over private property. according to media reports this expansion of epa regulatory power could include almost all man-made and natural streams, lakes and ponds. this undermines states rights and increases federal control of private property and the epa telling us what to do in our own backyard
environments, engaging audiences, making them more receptive to our policy initiatives. if you look at the report itself, and i do not want to go through it all, but i think i have not engaged in policy structure because that is what the white house does. i tried to give a how-to outline of how we do overseas, the challenges and opportunities we have. to highlight a couple of them, more than a couple, but one thing i think it's interesting is when we approach societies, i divided the report, in telling america's story versus engaging attitudes in a country. people are unclear what we put an emphasis on, and what i have said is every country will be different, and that is why that ties in the field are so important, because they can help us work through. anyone should weigh up, what are we trying to do here? do we want to take people overseas who might turn violent and say they do not take that route, but that they do not go the violent route. in this part of the world, after 9/11 it is a question we have to ask. every country is different. every one of them will have a different per
't believe in that. we mean that every classroom, every school environment should be a safe environment where everyone is welcomed regardless of who you are, regardless of your ethnic background, sexual orientation or cultural background and we don't couple that with behaviors that kids will display. and the other thing in terms of context that i want to make sure is clear and i didn't am happy you're here and we are fighting a battle against pop culture and the messages they receive on tv, logging on to the facebook page, logging on to all of the social media that is out there, think how many times in pop culture they refer to someone as "their little b, or little n" and that's just the way we greet each other and for someone that entered school only speaking spanish and you think about the language issues and in spanish i can tell you a whole bunch of terms that people use to great each other that are so racist, homo phobic and have a length and accepted as accepted and we need to work together and we're dealing with a culture we are trying to shift and in san francisco we are proud
environment work such as the rec and park to name a few. with regard to rec and park we've enjoyed a relationship and we've installed structures at the gilman playground and ralph playground and hertz playground to name a few and provided community garden development and trail maintenance in glen common and berry no heights and all of those were done with various mechanisms. however, we bring money to the table. so finally, from 19 to the perpetrate sf cc has provided $1.4 million of the property 84 funding we received from the state to remove and rebuild remaining walls and this in the buena invest and adams rogers just to name a few. at the conclusion we having ask the rec and park fill out an evaluation for the core member performance and the overall quality of the project. for the future we want to partner with rec and park to get some funding forbid the rec and parks trail fund and others. in some cases the application will be more competitive if you use the core as a partner to perform the work >> thank you for your time and attention i want to show you a 5 minute video of o
environment the oil we talk about is west texas and light sweet crude or wti and international oil is brent crude. west texas is 9 4.$09 a barrel. tell me why in simple terms our oil is different to produce. our oil is priced differently. the wti price and the brent price used to be essentially the same please. price. it's harder for our oil to get to the market and so it's pooling in the place the prices are set. that explains the discount. it does not explain it's harder to drill into the shale. if you look at oil historically big fields produce for a long period of time shale is not big fields it's a lot of little wells if the price falls the shale price can cut of faster tn the conventional pl supply migh. a lot of people didn't know that iran had as much oil reserves as they have to got saudi arabia and then ey iran and canada. it's not because of the fact that there are limitations of what they can export. i understand they have had real problems in the sanctions in actually producing it. >> absolutely to run run an oil field it needs maintenance. technologies that are available throu
past that meander up and down the park under pines and eucalyptus. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prep
of the environment. and i think the department and the staff, and has done a magnificent job after all of these years finding and moving into a new place that reflects the department and the city's environmental values and goals and it was really a pleasure to be able to tend and i encourage those of you who have not been there yet to go and see it. it is so different. and than the old place. >> make sure that you bring your id. >> yes, bring your id. >> and well, and thank you, commissioner for i meant to mention that and we did host over 200 members of the extended sf environment community and so thank you to all of the commissioners who were able to. and so we had other city agency and community, partners, and funders, and volunteers, staff, and it was a really wonderful celebration to show case how we are really walking the walk with the new space and living our values and our new office and so definitely welcome everybody to come if you have not seen it. >> thank you. >> commissioner stephenson? >> just a quick question, on the fund-raising grant, did any of these grants help us to make-up the s
understand public health and our environment don't think that so come in down and see how ♪ >> i am so looking forward to the street fair tomorrow. >> it is in the mission, how are we going to get there? we are not driving. >> well what do you suggest? >> there are a lot of great transportation choices in the city and there is one place to find them all, sfnta.com. >> sfmta.com. >> it is the walking parking, and riding muni and it is all here in one place. >> sitting in front of my computer waiting transportation options that is not exactly how i want to spend my saturday night. >> the new sfmta.com is mobile friendly, it works great on a tablet, smart phone or a lap top, it is built to go wherever we go. >> cool. >> but, let's just take the same route tomorrow that we always take, okay? >> it might be much more fun to ride our bikes. >> i am going to be way too tired to ride all the way home. >> okay, how about this, we can ride our bikes there and then we can take muni home and it even shows us how to take the bikes on the bus, so simple right here on my phone. >> neat. we can finish
's trashing environment and killing the water supply, all on land protected using taxpayer dollars. the destruction caused by illegal pot farmers. >> flying high above some of the country's most well known national parks. look closely and you'll see it. thousands of cake acres go on or near forest service land at a marijuana growth sight. >> it's a huge problem. almost an epidemic in our community. >> an epidemic with destructive effects that now goes bond the plibs of pot. >> there's a massive use of toxins out there. >> they're specifically targeting animals. anything that is going to kill a bear is going to kill me as well. >> it's not what they are growing but how they're doing it that ease wreaking havoc on california's rarest species and most precious resources. >> so far this year, the fresno county sheriff department has identified more than 500 growth sites and seized more than 2400 plants. and roughly 500,000 plants were found on national parkland statewide. >> how far away from federal land? >> just over that hill. >> lieutenant rick koe say is part of the marijuana rera
we're moving closer to an integrated mode of transportation that is good for our environment and community. so in closings thank you to everyone in our efforts and it's been eagerly awaited. i've been in the senate and the assembly n for 15 years so i've eagerly awaited this day. rest assured i'll continue to be an advocate in congress even in this is this tough environment for transportation infrastructure. i wish you the best of lick and a very happy labor day. thank you. again (clapping) >> knoll let me introduce our tremendous leader in the california state senate darryl stein beggar. >> good afternoon to leaders from the bay area. when i hear people talk about this bridge and today's events the touchstone that is most often talked about is 1989 the earthquake. and this is, of course, appropriate. but as steven said earlier the touchstone for this great california event could be just as easily been 1936 the year the bridge was build. for in 193 of this country was in the midst of the great depression. a signal to renewed civic effort proved that the pioneer spirit stil
forward to the completion of this project because those hospitals will create a great environment for us. it will create a level of pride in the work we do. most importantly for our patients the new hospitals will bring a more pleasant healing environment and an improved experience of care. for our patients family we'll have a great assurance that their loved ones are receiving the best care possible for for our community the new hospital represents community pride. in my current position at st. luke's it will be uplifting for the community. st. luke's has long been held the center of healing with the long history of deep roots. dr. i want to let you know we're proud to be that center of healing for the community and proud to be a member of the st. luke's. lastly to all involved in the cpmc project on behalf of all the nurses i wanted to extend our senility thanks for making this possible. thank you and have a wonderful day (clapping.) good morning. i'm warren brown the ceo of cpmc pr i honestly say there were many times i never thought i'd see this. and as i was driving here i was remi
a global leader, continuing to study our quality, climate change and the environment that connects us all. [applause] tam o'shaughnessy accepting on behalf of her life partner, dr. sally k ride. 30 years ago, dr. sally k ride soared into space as the youngest american and first woman to wear the stars and stripes above earth's atmosphere. as an astronaut, she sought to keep america at the forefront of space exploration. as a role model, she fought tirelessly to inspire young people, especially girls, to become scientifically literate and pursue careers in science, technology and engineering and math. at the end of her life, she became an inspiration for those meddling pancreatic cancer and for the lesbian/gay/bisexual and transgender community. the tale of a quiet hero, sally ride's story demonstrates that the sky is no limit for those who dream of reaching for the stars. [applause] walter nagel accepting on behalf of his partner, bayard rustin. [applause] bayard rustin was a giant in the american civil rights movement, openly gay at a time when many had to hide who they loved. his unwave
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
environment, in a different world. and at the same time, there's more awareness around mental health issues, and there's some more talking about it. and so young adults are little more knowledgeable about what they may be going through, what friends may be going through, a little more willing to seek help and to help the friends around them. and vanna, beyond the mental health challenges, or the mental health problems that they may face, there's also issues with illicit drugs and alcohol use? yes, there's both. young people are using prescription drugs and cocaine and heroin at higher rates at this young age, and they're starting younger, as well, meaning by the time they get to young adulthood, they've already used for a number of years. well for alcohol, for example, among the 18- to 20-year-olds, it's 31.2 percent, and it really, really escalates when you get to the 21- to 25-year-olds. we're looking at rates such as 45.4 percent, and these are 2010 figures. is this because they're mostly in school and they're binging, or what are we looking at? we're looking at young adults who are ente
sf and support the efforts of the environment, to gret green finance sf up and running again, i want to thank supervisors wiener, kim, yee for the co-sponsorship, as well as supervisor mar for his sponsorship. after nearly 6 months of ground work with various stakeholders from the environment, mayor lee and i announced to rekick start green finance sf, a program that will continue san francisco's tradition of being at the forefront of combating climate change, meeting our greenhouse emission reduction, our renewable energy pros in their homes. green finance sf is a program for residential properties of [inaudible] or less, otherwise known as pace, it's a financing structure that will enable san francisco at no cost to the city to fund energy efficient and renewable energy upgrades for property owners and home owners. green finance sf special form of financing will overcome market barriers by spreading cost recovery with savings realized over the lie of the improvement. the special form of financing allows owners to upgrade with a traditional tax assessment with extremely favorable t
made them or that it tends to be the environment even cancer and noted that competition and conflict among regional players is growing. apparent act of defiance against ageing latest declaration and the chill of support for its ally japan the us military said tuesday that a plea to the air force b fifty two bombers over disputed islands in the east china sea on monday without announcing themselves. when china set up its new air defense bill last week insisted that the foreign debt and nation planned to fly military aircraft roommates. the sound overlaps with one set by japan and capris disputed islands that are controlled by japan. it also partly overlaps that of korea including aerial space about the little house of cards rock mass lying on the two countries overlapping exclusive economic found baby east china sea. try as defence ministry said it was monitoring the entire flight path of the us bombers as they flew into town on monday although the spokesman said the planes were not in their search. architect at all eighteen announcement came in a row and territorial dispute with japa
something about the work environment.ptim >> at fox news and foxome business i the optimistic environmnment coming from e top but i have worked in the environments with a psychotic boss forwhes those whe do not to survey and thele general sense of injusti that makes for a terrible environment and these psychotic co-workers. melissa: it is a managementan style i have worked i the plays to pit people against each other that fear vs. .eward mechanism >> how successful? melissa: terrible.yon it was tough to make anybody can be the ceo or the boss env but that you peekskill that motivates people and they want to be involved. i agree. s work is positive.a melissa: they say if you are in the environment you look aa a stack of papers but you are just so overwhelmed.erwh >> what is worse is the inconsistency. if he treats your co-worker grea less and you are treated like crap you feel there is theed injustice but it goes to the corporate culture whether two orlt 200 it is the boss a and you have to motivate and inspire your workers. i love to be busy or i love to have a lot on my plate. >> i have se
to concentrate and learn. so a school safety environment is no. 1 and we know that when you have that safe environment it's backed up by respect and trust, students will learn better, they will attend school better and academically they will do well and socially they will do well. so socially we're very concerned about implementing at the ground level these laws tom has led the way in enacting. >> but there are a lot of people who don't think this is an issue, unfortunately, sadly. i know you are a big believer in this in mental health and good physical health and the link to academics. could you talk about that, please? >> all the research points to having a healthy school environment, having health in your life, many students, a quarter of our students in california have poverty, a quarter of our children have no health care. what was a million students a year and a half ago is now a million and a half. when you have good nutrition and good health, you will learn better. it goes hand in hand with good mental health and a good school environment. the research points out, we want our k
, showrooming, there is a real formal definition of showrooming. basically what it is, it's an environment where people can go in, they could touch, see, experience tangible goods that normally can be found only online. once they experience the product, they leave with a coupon code and then hopefully they buy online, simple as that. so, again, just to reinforce this, it's heavily focused on smaller companies. it just makes more sense for them because it's a new experience for a lot of our customers. it's not only a way to get you customers, but reinforce with existing customers. they find this through social media. similar fashion again to christina, a big part of this. one thing to note is people have used it, companies have used it as a transition to a more formal brick and mortar environment. so, to take one of our customers as a case in point, do-do case, cases for ipads and tablets here in san francisco, they've got about 25 or 30 people part of s.f. made. for them its was a good chance to test different retail environments. we started working with them about a year ago now. they've since
of a split between parties and where they stood in 2012. you can see environment as one of the issues where polarization had the, much more extreme -- become much more extreme , by the timeine this campaign was launched in the first two years of obama's presidency, it was virtually impossible for elected office holders in the republican party to consider joining the bipartisan coalition that would've been necessary to pass the legislation. question, whyg did the people who were supporting it think it would work? i'm going to leave that question talk about.or us to i do believe many of the business people and environment was who supported cap and trade were so focused on working out the details of a bargain inside of washington, d.c. trying to figure out how many allowances to give to which andons and how to reach out rope in more business leaders to support the legislation. the just operate on assumption that if they could get business support, that would deliver republican votes to congress. meanwhile, the republican party was changing. by 2009, that change had a label. tea party movement.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 655 (some duplicates have been removed)